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The Basilica Cistern

The Basilica Cistern, or Cisterna Basilica (Turkish: Yerebatan Sarnıcı or Yerebatan Saray, “Subterranean Cistern” or “Subterranean Palace”), is the largest of several hundred ancient cisterns that lie beneath the city of Istanbul, Turkey. The cistern, located 150 metres (490 ft) southwest of the Hagia Sophia on the historical peninsula of Sarayburnu, was built in the 6th century during the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I. Today it is kept with little water, for public access inside the space.

Galata Tower

The Galata Tower (Turkish: Galata Kulesi), called Christea Turris (the “Tower of Christ” in Latin) by the Genoese, is a medieval stone tower in the Galata/Karaköy quarter of Istanbul, Turkey, just to the north of the Golden Horn’s junction with the Bosphorus. It is a high, cone-capped cylinder that dominates the skyline and offers a panoramic vista of Istanbul’s historic peninsula and its environs.

Istiklal Street

İstiklal Avenue (Turkish: İstiklal Caddesi; English: “Independence Avenue”), historically known as the Grand Avenue of Pera (Ottoman Turkish: Cadde-i Kebir; Greek: Μεγάλη Οδός του Πέραν, romanized: Megali Odos tu Peran; French: Grande Rue de Péra) is one of the most famous avenues in Istanbul, Turkey, visited by nearly 3 million people in a single day over the course of weekends.

Spice Bazaar

The Spice Bazaar (Turkish: Mısır Çarşısı, meaning “Egyptian Bazaar”) in Istanbul, Turkey is one of the largest bazaars in the city. Located in the Eminönü quarter of the Fatih district, it is the most famous covered shopping complex after the Grand Bazaar.

Chora Church

The Kariye Mosque (Turkish: Kariye Camii), or the Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora (Greek: Ἐκκλησία τοῦ Ἁγίου Σωτῆρος ἐν τῇ Χώρᾳ), is a medieval Greek Orthodox church[1] used as a mosque today in the Edirnekapı neighborhood of Istanbul, Turkey. The neighborhood is situated in the western part of the municipality (belediye) of the Fatih district. The Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora was built in the style of Byzantine architecture.

Topkapi Palace

The Topkapı Palace (Turkish: Topkapı Sarayı;[2] Ottoman Turkish: طوپقپو سرايى‎, romanized: Ṭopḳapu Sarāyı, lit. ’Cannon Gate Palace’),[3] or the Seraglio,[4] is a large museum in the east of the Fatih district of Istanbul in Turkey. In the 15th and 16th centuries it served as the main residence and administrative headquarters of the Ottoman sultans.

The Blue Mosque

Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Turkish: Sultan Ahmet Camii), also known as the Blue Mosque, is an Ottoman-era Friday mosque located in Istanbul, Turkey. A functioning mosque, it also attracts large numbers of tourist visitors. It was constructed between 1609 and 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I. Its Külliye contains Ahmed’s tomb, a madrasah and a hospice.

Dolmabahçe Palace

Dolmabahçe Palace (Turkish: Dolmabahçe Sarayı, IPA: [doɫmabahˈtʃe saɾaˈjɯ]) located in the Beşiktaş district of Istanbul, Turkey, on the European coast of the Bosporus strait, served as the main administrative center of the Ottoman Empire from 1856 to 1887 and from 1909 to 1922.

Hagia Sophia

Hagía Sophia, officially Ayasofya-i Kebir Cami-i Şerifi, literally Holy Mosque of Hagia Sophia the Grand, and formerly the Church of Hagia Sophia, is a Late Antique place of worship in Istanbul, designed by the Greek geometers Isidore of Miletus and Anthemius of Tralles.

Grand Bazaar

The Grand Bazaar (Turkish: Kapalıçarşı, meaning ‘Covered Market’; also Büyük Çarşı, meaning ‘Grand Market) in Istanbul is one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world, with 61 covered streets and over 4,000 shops on a total area of 30,700 m2, attracting between 250,000 and 400,000 visitors daily